State single-payer news Category

Defying experience and reason, we can anticipate that the GOP’s principles and approaches will make an imploding ACA system even worse. We can then expect a huge backlash from the public and even the private insurance industry when it doesn’t get all that it wants.

Trump’s political appointees further show how unlikely it is that any swamp will be drained—instead, we can expect quite the opposite, and that doesn’t bode well for health care.

What will happen in Congress in January remains unclear. Democrats can ward off a filibuster in the Senate while the Republicans are deeply divided over the ACA’s repeal and replacement options.

The ACA bailed out the industry in 2010, which is once again calling for more government subsidies to stay in business. A just-released estimate by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) acknowledges that the three-year risk corridor deficit from 2014 through 2016 for insurer losses will exceed $14 billion. (4)

Medical students and their colleagues in other health professions are looking for a simplified system with universal access for all Americans to necessary care based on the principle that health care is a human right. That approach has been adopted for many years, in one way or another, by almost all advanced countries, while the U. S. remains by far the most expensive system with worse access and quality of care than most of these countries.

Despite grudging acceptance of EHRs by most physicians, they are here to stay.

Mylan’s EpiPen story is a classic poster child for continued corporate greed that knows no bounds.

Conservative politicians, including both Republicans and many Democrats, have long been wary of a single-payer public financing system for national health insurance (NHI). They go out of their way to denigrate the Canadian system, even though it is extremely popular in Canada since its enactment in the 1970s, is tied to a private delivery system, and is more efficient and less bureaucratic with better outcomes than our far more expensive system.

A common myth among opponents of single-payer national health insurance (NHI) is that it would cost too much and break the bank. This belief is based in part upon an assumption that patients would overuse health care if they gained access to it without any cost-sharing when they seek care. Cost-sharing has been a lynchpin […]

The TPP will make all this even worse. If ratified in this country, as it could be in a lame duck Congress after the November elections, the TPP would drive drug prices in the U. S. even higher than they now are, limit competition further, and prevent the government from negotiating drug prices, as the Veterans Administration has done for many years, successfully gaining discounts of about 42 percent.

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Physicians for a National Health Program's blog serves to facilitate communication among physicians and the public. The views presented on this blog are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent the views of PNHP.

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